economic evaluation, health economics, Sanitation, SanQoL

Better lives with better toilets – SanQoL translated for public engagement

[I was chuffed to be joint winner in the ESRC 'Better Lives' writing competition with the below piece intended for a general audience. The Guardian published an abridged version. Deadlines are 80% of writing, for me at least... so I would recommend competitions like this for forcing oneself to write to a hard deadline for public… Continue reading Better lives with better toilets – SanQoL translated for public engagement

health economics, Quality of Service, Sanitation, SanQoL, welfare economics

Quality of Service vs. Quality of Life – ways of measuring sanitation outcomes

[These are very much half-formed thoughts, so critique is welcome. I may well refine it as I think about this more and discuss with people. I bashed this out during LSHTM Environmental Health Group’s ‘writing group’, which I recommend as a group process to force you to write…] In a previous post I explored the… Continue reading Quality of Service vs. Quality of Life – ways of measuring sanitation outcomes

economic evaluation, Sanitation

CLTS, targeting and economic performance – reflections on two seminars

Today I attended not one, but two, seminars on CLTS. The first was Britta Augsburg presenting results of a recent cRCT of a WaterAid CLTS intervention in Nigeria (at LSHTM). The second was Dale Whittington reflecting on CLTS trials in the last few years and his recent CBA paper incorporating their results (at Oxford). A… Continue reading CLTS, targeting and economic performance – reflections on two seminars

costs., Sanitation

Recall bias and cost data

I've been working on costing a few programmes recently where the intervention happened between 3-10 years ago. Both used household surveys asking people what they spent (in cash and in kind) towards the original infrastructure output (CapEx), towards regular operational and maintenance (OpEx) and irregular capital maintenance (CapManEx). It's got me thinking about the various… Continue reading Recall bias and cost data

funding & financing, Sanitation

Sanitation’s share of water sector aid is falling

I went to an interesting event at LSHTM last night run by Countdown 2030, on tracking aid flows to track global aid flows to reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH). Their dataset is here. Yet another reminder that the health sector is way ahead of the WASH sector on so many analytical questions, but… Continue reading Sanitation’s share of water sector aid is falling

costs., Sanitation

Incremental benefits from increases in sanitation service level

The Indus valley civilisation (c.2,000 BCE) coupled on-plot water supply from wells with the first known sewers. However, it was the Minoans (also c.2,000 BCE) who were the first to have piped water systems – I marvelled at the clay pipes and stone sewers at Knossos on Crete. The Minoans understood that piped water on… Continue reading Incremental benefits from increases in sanitation service level

Sanitation

Determinants of urban sanitation costs – ‘willingness to connect’ and scale effects

The Daudey 2017 paper (open access) I reviewed in this post has a useful table (p.7) of 9  determinants of urban sanitation costs. I would tend to group them more simply into three headings as below - I won't go into these more here as the table in the paper is good. 1. Technology: technology type, level… Continue reading Determinants of urban sanitation costs – ‘willingness to connect’ and scale effects