Quality of Service, Sanitation, SanQoL

Quality of what? From whose perspective? Thoughts on measuring sanitation quality

Yesterday I was on a panel at the UNC Water and Health conference side-event entitled “What is “Quality” Sanitation? Investigating Service Standards and User Experience in Rural and Urban Settings”. You can watch back the event here (if registered for the conference, which is free). Below follows some of my views on the measurement of… Continue reading Quality of what? From whose perspective? Thoughts on measuring sanitation quality

Costs, economic evaluation, My papers, Sanitation, the WASH sector

New paper – trial-based cost-benefit analysis of a CLTS intervention in Ethiopia

My colleague Seungman Cha has a paper out this week, which I co-authored with him and others. It’s a trial-based cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of a community-led total sanitation (CLTS) intervention in rural south-western Ethiopia. We estimated intervention delivery costs from financial records and recurrent costs from the trial's surveys. All outcome data are from the… Continue reading New paper – trial-based cost-benefit analysis of a CLTS intervention in Ethiopia

the WASH sector

My and others’ WASH economics sessions at #UNCwaterandhealth 2019

I’ve just arrived at the UNC Water and Health conference 2019 this week (verbal abstracts book here). I have three verbal presentations, a poster, and am involved in a side-event. Short summaries are below. Further below, I highlight others’ economics-related presentations/sessions that I’m looking forward to seeing. All my stuff is on Thursday… but please talk… Continue reading My and others’ WASH economics sessions at #UNCwaterandhealth 2019

Costs, Sanitation, the WASH sector, Water

Funders shouldn’t misinterpret WASH-B and SHINE results as “WASH doesn’t work”

There has been a lot of debate about the well-designed and well-conducted WASH-B (Kenya, Bangladesh) and SHINE (Zimbabwe) trials of rural WASH interventions in the past year or so. Most recently, researchers active in WASH epidemiology published a consensus paper. Many funders may not read it, which would be a shame, as it is easy… Continue reading Funders shouldn’t misinterpret WASH-B and SHINE results as “WASH doesn’t work”

health economics, the WASH sector

Economist-engineers and public health economists: is WASH economics a “field”?

Is WASH economics a 'field'? This post explores ways of breaking down the “field” of WASH economics. On the one hand, one can argue that WASH economics doesn’t exist as a coherent field. After all, most people actually working on WASH economics questions are in the field of engineering and/or public health. There are fairly… Continue reading Economist-engineers and public health economists: is WASH economics a “field”?

Quality of Service, Sanitation, SanQoL

A generalised way of thinking about sanitation quality of service and quality of life

In a previous post, I wrote about how I see measures of quality of service (QoS) and quality of life (QoL) capturing different things which are both important. In this post, I expand on that, proposing a generalised way of thinking about this at different stages of the service chain. First, though, a few words… Continue reading A generalised way of thinking about sanitation quality of service and quality of life

economic evaluation, health economics, Sanitation, SanQoL

Better lives with better toilets – SanQoL translated for public engagement

[I was chuffed to be joint winner in the ESRC 'Better Lives' writing competition with the below piece intended for a general audience. The Guardian published an abridged version. Deadlines are 80% of writing, for me at least... so I would recommend competitions like this for forcing oneself to write to a hard deadline for public… Continue reading Better lives with better toilets – SanQoL translated for public engagement

health economics, Quality of Service, Sanitation, SanQoL, welfare economics

Quality of Service vs. Quality of Life – ways of measuring sanitation outcomes

In a previous post I explored the concept of sanitation-related quality of life (SanQoL). In that post I distinguished between “quality of service” (and/or infrastructure) and quality of life. The present post expands a bit on that distinction. 1. Different ways of measuring "quality" Consider these three questions for assessing the concept of privacy: [observe]… Continue reading Quality of Service vs. Quality of Life – ways of measuring sanitation outcomes

economic evaluation, health economics, PhD, Sanitation, SanQoL

Using the concept of ‘sanitation-related quality of life’ (SanQoL) to measure what is valued by users

Introduction Since investment options are always compared under a budget constraint, economic evaluation aims to inform unavoidable decisions and support allocative efficiency. Various economic evaluation methods (such as cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis) compare costs and consequences of alternative interventions. Improvements in sanitation can impact on health, and it is typically health outcomes such as averted… Continue reading Using the concept of ‘sanitation-related quality of life’ (SanQoL) to measure what is valued by users