costs., health economics, Sanitation, Water

The economics of antimicrobial resistance and the role of water and sanitation services

  Seeing a paper published a few weeks ago in Nature Communications (more on that below) reminded me of some reading I did last year on WASH and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and got me thinking about the economics of this. What is AMR? Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurs when microorganisms adapt after exposure to antimicrobial drugs… Continue reading The economics of antimicrobial resistance and the role of water and sanitation services

costs., funding & financing

The difference between economic and financial analysis for WASH services

The distinction between economic analysis and financial analysis is not always straightforward. In this post I try to clarify this. Definitions I have previously defined WASH economics as “the study of how people make decisions about the allocation of scarce resources in the delivery and use of WASH services.” See that post for more discussion… Continue reading The difference between economic and financial analysis for WASH services

costs., Sanitation

Recall bias and cost data

I've been working on costing a few programmes recently where the intervention happened between 3-10 years ago. Both used household surveys asking people what they spent (in cash and in kind) towards the original infrastructure output (CapEx), towards regular operational and maintenance (OpEx) and irregular capital maintenance (CapManEx). It's got me thinking about the various… Continue reading Recall bias and cost data

Sanitation, welfare economics

Preferences and constraints – when does container-based sanitation address the binding constraint to uptake?

In welfare economics, “preferences” denote which alternative goods or services someone would choose, based on the relative “utility” provided by each (more on utility another time). For example, when presented with a box of chocolates, my first choice is always a praline (P). But if only marzipan fruits (M) and brazil nut caramels (B) were… Continue reading Preferences and constraints – when does container-based sanitation address the binding constraint to uptake?

health economics, Water

Water supply & diarrhoea – latest systematic review and economic implications

An update to the WHO-led systematic review of the ‘Impact of drinking water, sanitation and handwashing with soap on childhood diarrhoeal disease’ by Wolf et al. (2018) was published in TMIH in May. I re-read it last week with a water supply hat on, and was interested to see how they’ve improved on the 2014… Continue reading Water supply & diarrhoea – latest systematic review and economic implications

Sanitation

Categorisation of shared sanitation – some city-wide data using one approach

There has been a fair amount of debate on the role of shared sanitation in urban settings recently, see e.g. this comment piece from various stakeholders, this paper (plus others) from Sheillah Simiyu and this one from Marieke Heijnen. Also, WSUP recently issued an RFP for multi-country research on shared sanitation. In my own little… Continue reading Categorisation of shared sanitation – some city-wide data using one approach

funding & financing, Sanitation

Sanitation’s share of water sector aid is falling

I went to an interesting event at LSHTM last night run by Countdown 2030, on tracking aid flows to track global aid flows to reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH). Their dataset is here. Yet another reminder that the health sector is way ahead of the WASH sector on so many analytical questions, but… Continue reading Sanitation’s share of water sector aid is falling

costs., Sanitation

Incremental benefits from increases in sanitation service level

The Indus valley civilisation (c.2,000 BCE) coupled on-plot water supply from wells with the first known sewers. However, it was the Minoans (also c.2,000 BCE) who were the first to have piped water systems – I marvelled at the clay pipes and stone sewers at Knossos on Crete. The Minoans understood that piped water on… Continue reading Incremental benefits from increases in sanitation service level

Sanitation

Determinants of urban sanitation costs – ‘willingness to connect’ and scale effects

The Daudey 2017 paper (open access) I reviewed in this post has a useful table (p.7) of 9  determinants of urban sanitation costs. I would tend to group them more simply into three headings as below - I won't go into these more here as the table in the paper is good. 1. Technology: technology type, level… Continue reading Determinants of urban sanitation costs – ‘willingness to connect’ and scale effects

Sanitation

What do we know about urban sanitation costs? (a review of Daudey, 2017)

A review paper (open access) on the costs of urban sanitation came out last year. Authored by Loïc Daudey (now of AFD but then a consultant for WSUP) it surveys the literature on lifecycle costs of full chain chain systems in Africa and Asia. I found it very useful for my purposes so thought I'd write a quick review.… Continue reading What do we know about urban sanitation costs? (a review of Daudey, 2017)