economic evaluation, health economics, Sanitation, SanQoL

Better lives with better toilets – SanQoL translated for public engagement

[I was chuffed to be joint winner in the ESRC 'Better Lives' writing competition with the below piece intended for a general audience. The Guardian published an abridged version. Deadlines are 80% of writing, for me at least... so I would recommend competitions like this for forcing oneself to write to a hard deadline for public… Continue reading Better lives with better toilets – SanQoL translated for public engagement

health economics, Quality of Service, Sanitation, SanQoL, welfare economics

Quality of Service vs. Quality of Life – ways of measuring sanitation outcomes

[These are very much half-formed thoughts, so critique is welcome. I may well refine it as I think about this more and discuss with people. I bashed this out during LSHTM Environmental Health Group’s ‘writing group’, which I recommend as a group process to force you to write…] In a previous post I explored the… Continue reading Quality of Service vs. Quality of Life – ways of measuring sanitation outcomes

economic evaluation, health economics, PhD, Sanitation, SanQoL

Using the concept of ‘sanitation-related quality of life’ (SanQoL) to measure what is valued by users

Introduction Since investment options are always compared under a budget constraint, economic evaluation aims to inform unavoidable decisions and support allocative efficiency. Various economic evaluation methods (such as cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis) compare costs and consequences of alternative interventions. Improvements in sanitation can impact on health, and it is typically health outcomes such as averted… Continue reading Using the concept of ‘sanitation-related quality of life’ (SanQoL) to measure what is valued by users

costs., health economics, Sanitation, Water

The economics of antimicrobial resistance and the role of water and sanitation services

  Seeing a paper published a few weeks ago in Nature Communications (more on that below) reminded me of some reading I did last year on WASH and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and got me thinking about the economics of this. What is AMR? Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurs when microorganisms adapt after exposure to antimicrobial drugs… Continue reading The economics of antimicrobial resistance and the role of water and sanitation services

health economics, Water

Water supply & diarrhoea – latest systematic review and economic implications

An update to the WHO-led systematic review of the ‘Impact of drinking water, sanitation and handwashing with soap on childhood diarrhoeal disease’ by Wolf et al. (2018) was published in TMIH in May. I re-read it last week with a water supply hat on, and was interested to see how they’ve improved on the 2014… Continue reading Water supply & diarrhoea – latest systematic review and economic implications

health economics, PhD

To what should we compare the economic performance of WASH interventions?

I first got interested in health economics about 10 years ago when reading various chapters of Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries (DCP2) - its third edition is currently being worked on. Ranking interventions by cost-effectiveness is a compelling way to frame discussions about prioritisation. See for example the graphic below, which comes from p.41 of this chapter of DCP2. It… Continue reading To what should we compare the economic performance of WASH interventions?

health economics

Why is WASH economics so far behind health economics?

The more I read on health economics, the more I realise how far WASH economics is "behind", especially on economic evaluation. I mean this in terms of methods, the extent/level of debate on key questions, and the size/engagement of the community of people working on it. The "how" question (in what ways it is behind,… Continue reading Why is WASH economics so far behind health economics?