Quality of Service, Sanitation, SanQoL

A generalised way of thinking about sanitation quality of service and quality of life

In a previous post, I wrote about how I see measures of quality of service (QoS) and quality of life (QoL) capturing different things which are both important. In this post, I expand on that, proposing a generalised way of thinking about this at different stages of the service chain. First, though, a few words… Continue reading A generalised way of thinking about sanitation quality of service and quality of life

economic evaluation, health economics, Sanitation, SanQoL

Better lives with better toilets – SanQoL translated for public engagement

[I was chuffed to be joint winner in the ESRC 'Better Lives' writing competition with the below piece intended for a general audience. The Guardian published an abridged version. Deadlines are 80% of writing, for me at least... so I would recommend competitions like this for forcing oneself to write to a hard deadline for public… Continue reading Better lives with better toilets – SanQoL translated for public engagement

health economics, Quality of Service, Sanitation, SanQoL, welfare economics

Quality of Service vs. Quality of Life – ways of measuring sanitation outcomes

[These are very much half-formed thoughts, so critique is welcome. I may well refine it as I think about this more and discuss with people. I bashed this out during LSHTM Environmental Health Group’s ‘writing group’, which I recommend as a group process to force you to write…] In a previous post I explored the… Continue reading Quality of Service vs. Quality of Life – ways of measuring sanitation outcomes

economic evaluation, health economics, PhD, Sanitation, SanQoL

Using the concept of ‘sanitation-related quality of life’ (SanQoL) to measure what is valued by users

Introduction Since investment options are always compared under a budget constraint, economic evaluation aims to inform unavoidable decisions and support allocative efficiency. Various economic evaluation methods (such as cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis) compare costs and consequences of alternative interventions. Improvements in sanitation can impact on health, and it is typically health outcomes such as averted… Continue reading Using the concept of ‘sanitation-related quality of life’ (SanQoL) to measure what is valued by users

economic evaluation, Sanitation

CLTS, targeting and economic performance – reflections on two seminars

Today I attended not one, but two, seminars on CLTS. The first was Britta Augsburg presenting results of a recent cRCT of a WaterAid CLTS intervention in Nigeria (at LSHTM). The second was Dale Whittington reflecting on CLTS trials in the last few years and his recent CBA paper incorporating their results (at Oxford). A… Continue reading CLTS, targeting and economic performance – reflections on two seminars

Water

Recent increases in rural water access in African countries relied predominantly on groundwater

The JMP’s online analysis tool allows water supply data to be cut by service level (safely managed, basic etc.) or facility type (piped, non-piped), as set out in their 2018 methods doc. "Piped", W2 in their indicator list (p.4) includes all tap water classifications (p.9), i.e. both on-plot piped and off-plot kiosks or public taps.… Continue reading Recent increases in rural water access in African countries relied predominantly on groundwater

costs., health economics, Sanitation, Water

The economics of antimicrobial resistance and the role of water and sanitation services

  Seeing a paper published a few weeks ago in Nature Communications (more on that below) reminded me of some reading I did last year on WASH and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and got me thinking about the economics of this. What is AMR? Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurs when microorganisms adapt after exposure to antimicrobial drugs… Continue reading The economics of antimicrobial resistance and the role of water and sanitation services

costs., funding & financing

The difference between economic and financial analysis for WASH services

The distinction between economic analysis and financial analysis is not always straightforward. In this post I try to clarify this. Definitions I have previously defined WASH economics as “the study of how people make decisions about the allocation of scarce resources in the delivery and use of WASH services.” See that post for more discussion… Continue reading The difference between economic and financial analysis for WASH services

costs., Sanitation

Recall bias and cost data

I've been working on costing a few programmes recently where the intervention happened between 3-10 years ago. Both used household surveys asking people what they spent (in cash and in kind) towards the original infrastructure output (CapEx), towards regular operational and maintenance (OpEx) and irregular capital maintenance (CapManEx). It's got me thinking about the various… Continue reading Recall bias and cost data