Climate, Planetary Health

Planetary health and WASH: causes and consequences

What is planetary health? Humanity is emitting too much CO2 and using ever-increasing amounts of energy and water. The human population is set to swell for the foreseeable, requiring both more food and the water to grow it. At the same time, climate change is threatening progress across the board. These trends have spurred a… Continue reading Planetary health and WASH: causes and consequences

Benefits, hygiene, Sanitation, Water

Human capital and WASH – a note

Possible mechanisms by which WASH increases human capital In labour economics, human capital is a worker’s stock of knowledge and skills which contributes to their productivity and earnings. Human capital accumulation is a process of developing skills within and beyond cognitive domains, in which the first 1,000 days of a child’s life are crucial. In… Continue reading Human capital and WASH – a note

economic evaluation, funding & financing, the WASH sector

What is transformative WASH?

Figure 1: Transformative in respect of what? This post summarises a note I have drafted on the definition of "transformative WASH", available here, with references. There has been a lot of talk about “transformative” WASH since the WASH-B, SHINE and MapSan results came out. I have previously written about those results here. The argument runs… Continue reading What is transformative WASH?

Quality of Service, Sanitation, SanQoL

Quality of what? From whose perspective? Thoughts on measuring sanitation quality

Yesterday I was on a panel at the UNC Water and Health conference side-event entitled “What is “Quality” Sanitation? Investigating Service Standards and User Experience in Rural and Urban Settings”. You can watch back the event here (if registered for the conference, which is free). Below follows some of my views on the measurement of… Continue reading Quality of what? From whose perspective? Thoughts on measuring sanitation quality

Costs, economic evaluation, My papers, Sanitation, the WASH sector

New paper – trial-based cost-benefit analysis of a CLTS intervention in Ethiopia

My colleague Seungman Cha has a paper out this week, which I co-authored with him and others. It’s a trial-based cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of a community-led total sanitation (CLTS) intervention in rural south-western Ethiopia. We estimated intervention delivery costs from financial records and recurrent costs from the trial's surveys. All outcome data are from the… Continue reading New paper – trial-based cost-benefit analysis of a CLTS intervention in Ethiopia

the WASH sector

My and others’ WASH economics sessions at #UNCwaterandhealth 2019

I’ve just arrived at the UNC Water and Health conference 2019 this week (verbal abstracts book here). I have three verbal presentations, a poster, and am involved in a side-event. Short summaries are below. Further below, I highlight others’ economics-related presentations/sessions that I’m looking forward to seeing. All my stuff is on Thursday… but please talk… Continue reading My and others’ WASH economics sessions at #UNCwaterandhealth 2019

Costs, Sanitation, the WASH sector, Water

Funders shouldn’t misinterpret WASH-B and SHINE results as “WASH doesn’t work”

There has been a lot of debate about the well-designed and well-conducted WASH-B (Kenya, Bangladesh) and SHINE (Zimbabwe) trials of rural WASH interventions in the past year or so. Most recently, researchers active in WASH epidemiology published a consensus paper. Many funders may not read it, which would be a shame, as it is easy… Continue reading Funders shouldn’t misinterpret WASH-B and SHINE results as “WASH doesn’t work”

health economics, the WASH sector

Economist-engineers and public health economists: is WASH economics a “field”?

Is WASH economics a 'field'? This post explores ways of breaking down the “field” of WASH economics. On the one hand, one can argue that WASH economics doesn’t exist as a coherent field. After all, most people actually working on WASH economics questions are in the field of engineering and/or public health. There are fairly… Continue reading Economist-engineers and public health economists: is WASH economics a “field”?